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A touch of Rural India - Class trip

By Radhika Krishna
From St Joseph's college, Bangalore
Posted Mar 4th 2013 6:00AM



Back in school, class trips always generated bouts of excitement, enthusiasm and energy and a similar gush was placard by the students of 3rd IES (Industrial Relations, Economics and Sociology). As part of their Sociology curriculum, the first of March saw the class visiting a village located nearly 85 kilometers away from the heart of the city.

Boarding the bus early in the morning, and singing till their throats turned hoarse, the class stopped at the International Pyramid Valley off Kanakapura road which is listed as one of Bangalore's seven wonders. Here, they learnt about the Buddhist method of meditation and how energy is trapped more effectively in geometrical shaped buildings. They were advised to meditate for effective concentration and spiritual growth for a time span of minutes in tune with their respective ages.

After which, they rode on to the village church and were greeted by the head priest who took extra care to prepare the afternoon meal. Deciding to hold a potluck, they played several games and gathered up an appetite for a luncheon to remember.

Full and content, they proceeded to the village and interacted with several of the village folk who displayed immense hospitality by providing them with drinking water and even permitting some of the students to enter their homes. Most of them attended to silk worms and had beds of worms feasting on mulberry leaves that spun their cocoon waiting to be dipped into boiling hot water before fine mulberry silk could be extracted.

Some of them even took home the silk worm cocoons and after a cup of tea headed back to the city. They stopped at the Sri Ravi Krishna ashram where they were exposed to another form of meditation that involved chants and prayers.

A Friday well spent, the students returned late in the evening, exhausted but enthralled and having learnt so much all on their own accord.

Christina Martin, a student from the class said, "This was our first official outreach program and we organised it on our own. It was a fun experience spending time with my classmates and teachers. It is only during such times that one gets to know some people much better. We learnt so much and I am especially biased to the quaint little huts we visited and passed."

All in all, undergraduate study seems to have generated a practical exposure like none other however short lived it has been. An introduction to 'What's next?', the students finally agglomerated together all they had learnt in the past three years of their Sociology syllabus through this one day visit.



Back in school, class trips always generated bouts of excitement, enthusiasm and energy and a similar gush was placard by the students of 3rd IES (Industrial Relations, Economics and Sociology). As part of their Sociology curriculum, the first of March saw the class visiting a village located nearly 85 kilometres away from the heart of the city.

Boarding the bus early in the morning, and singing till their throats turned hoarse, the class stopped at the International Pyramid Valley off Kanakpura road which is listed as one of Bangalore's seven wonders. Here, they learnt about the Buddhist method of meditation and how energy is trapped more effectively in geometrical shaped buildings. They were advised to meditate for effective concentration and spiritual growth for a time span of minutes in tune with their respective ages.

After which, they rode on to the village church and were greeted by the head priest who took extra care to prepare the afternoon meal. Deciding to hold a potluck, they played several games and gathered up an appetite for a luncheon to remember.

Full and content, they proceeded to the village and interacted with several of the village folk who displayed immense hospitality by providing them with drinking water and even permitting some of the students to enter their homes. Most of them attended to silk worms and had beds of worms feasting on mulberry leaves that spun their cocoon waiting to be dipped into boiling hot water before fine mulberry silk could be extracted.

Some of them even took home the silk worm cocoons and after a cup of tea headed back to the city. They stopped at the Sri Ravi Krishna ashram where they were exposed to another form of meditation that involved chants and prayers.

A Friday well spent, the students returned late in the evening, exhausted but enthralled and having learnt so much all on their own accord.

Christina Martin, a student from the class said, "This was our first official outreach program and we organised it on our own. It was a fun experience spending time with my classmates and teachers. It is only during such times that one gets to know some people much better. We learnt so much and I am especially biased to the quaint little huts we visited and passed."

All in all, undergraduate study seems to have generated a practical exposure like none other however short lived it has been. An introduction to 'What's next?', the students finally agglomerated together all they had learnt in the past three years of their Sociology syllabus through this one day visit.
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